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Archive for February 3rd, 2021

Protecting Your Dog in the Snow and Ice

Wednesday, February 3, 2021
posted by Jim Murphy

There’s lots of snow in many parts of the country. Most dogs love romping around and playing in the snow but there are some protective measures that we should be mindful of. Purina a put together some helpful information which I will share with you. Don’t take the snow and ice lightly when it comes to your pet. There are steps you should take to ensure that your best friend stays safe and warm.

The following is taken from an article written by the Purina company

How to Protect Your Dog in Snow & Ice

1. Gradually Acclimate to the Cold

According to Dr. RuthAnn Lobos, veterinarian and Purina’s Senior Manager of Training, “The key is acclimation. If they seem fine and aren’t shivering or trying to get in, it’s perfectly fine for them to stay outside for longer periods as long as they’re building up to it.” Start with short sessions outside and slowly increase so they have time to adjust.

2. Make Potty Time More Efficient

Try shoveling a patch of grass for potty time so they have a spot to go right away. If there are areas with more protection from snow, ice and wind, encourage your pup to go there instead. Give treats after to reinforce the good behavior and discourage accidents inside.

3. Keep an Eye Out for Rock Salt & Antifreeze

Rock salt isn’t toxic, but it may upset their stomach if ingested and can irritate their paws. Antifreeze tastes sweet but is toxic. Look for blue or green-colored substances on driveways, sidewalks and cars and keep dogs away from those spots. Wipe off their paws before they come inside to remove any salt or antifreeze residue they might lick off. This will also warm the paws faster.

4. Learn How to Warm them Up

If your dog seems cold, cover him with a towel or blanket. You can also use a blow dryer on a low setting, but don’t heat his paw pads, as they could burn. Instead, heat up some rice in a sock (place against your wrist to ensure it’s not too hot). If you know your dog gets cold easily, stock up in advance on sweaters, coats and booties.

5. Protect Dog Paws in Winter

For cracked paw pads, use a moisturizer made for cow udders to soothe your dog’s paws. After applying, keep him busy with a puzzle feeder or treat so he doesn’t lick it off immediately. To protect your dog’s paws in winter and prevent cracked pads, try putting your dog in booties. Otherwise clean his paws every time he comes inside.

6. Don’t Neglect Exercise

Idle time can lead to destructive or nervous behavior due to pent-up energy. Once you’ve acclimated your dog and prepared for cold weather, continue walking your dog in winter and let him play outside.

You could even get creative and build a small agility course out of piles of snow. If conditions are too cold or icy, consider an indoor gym for dogs or give them a puzzle feeder or play indoor games to keep them busy.

By following the above tips, your dog can enjoy the snow and play to his heart’s content.

Remember, your pets count!

Sometimes when a pet gets sick we rely solely on our vets which is always the best way to go but there are also some natural remedies that could also play a big role in maintaining your pets health. Kidney disease is fatal to cats and unfortunately it is all too common. Astros Oil is a natural high potency omega product developed by a doctor in Canada. It has amazing properties and can prolong life and improve the quality of life for cats with kidney disease. Read about Astros Oil and purchase it online at Astros Oil.com.

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