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Archive for December, 2017

You let your dog out in the yard for some exercise. The yard is his “safe place” because it’s fenced in and  you don’t have to stand their and watch him, but maybe you do. Dogs love roaming around in the back yard. They also love to dig. If your dog is small, he can easily dig a whole and slip under your fence.

To ensure that your fence is secure, I would walk around and make sure that the fence is secure and is not compromised in any way. Now there is something you could do solve the digging problem. You can build an impenetrable barrier under your fence. It’s called L-footer and it’s just what it sounds like. The bottom of the L lays on the ground making it impossible for your dog to get close enough to the fence to dig under it.

If your dog jumps, you can add a small inner fence or hedges thatd will keep the dog from getting close enough to the barrier to clear it.

Escaping isn’t only a problem for large dogs. Small dogs can fit their heads between the rods on the fence or gate. A harness or collar attachment like Puppy Bumper or Dog Gamutt can make your dog “too big” to fit through.

Thanks to Tether-Tug for providing some of this valuable information.

Remember, your pets count!

EDGEWATER GOLD RADIO is your holiday and variety station playing great memories, popular standards and lots of holiday favorites. They’re playing now! Don’t miss them. Download the free Edgewater GOLD Radio app and listen from our website: The Edgewater Internet Radio Network!

 

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Heartwarming Pet Rescue on a Cold Cold Day!

Wednesday, December 13, 2017
posted by Jim Murphy

One day, a customer raced into a hardware store in south western Wisconsin and told the manager that there was  what sounded like a kitten yowling loudly inside of a pickup truck. The manager ran out to investigate and he heard the sound of  the frantic kitten too. The sounds were  coming from inside a wheel well. But the manager couldn’t see the kitten. The manager whose name was Bob ran back into the store and told a staff member to call the Humane Society and the police department. He asked another staff member to try to find the owner of the vehicle.  Bob got his tools and crawled under the truck. He saw the kitten but could not get to him.

Soon the animal control officer showed up, as did a patrolman. A television station crew showed up too alerted by a report on police radio scanner!

Bob still worked hard and he finally freed the tiny kitten, pulled him out and handed him over to the animal control officer. The TV Crew interviewed them and the segment aired that afternoon and evening. The kitten went to the Humane Society where it was examined and later adopted.

I love this true story because we live in a world where cats are so often devalued and people seem to be becoming much colder, there are ordinary people who will urgently do everything in their power to save a helpless kitten.

Remember, your pets count and have a Merry Christmas!

Keep the oldies, standards and holiday music playing at work today. EDGEWATER GOLD RADIO is your go to station for a great variety of oldies from the 50s through the 80’s plus we include great popular standards and now holiday music in our mix!

Download the free Edgewater Gold Radio app today and listen from our website, The Edgewater Gold Radio Network!

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Sometimes We Just Have To Improvise

Tuesday, December 12, 2017
posted by Jim Murphy

As you know, my cat Molly is 18 1/2 years old and she’s been struggling with Thyroid and Kidney disease for the past 3 years. Several months ago, Molly decided that she no longer wanted to urinate in her litter box. She would urinate on the bathroom rug. This was very frustrating since cat urine has a very unpleasant smell and every time I walked into the bathroom, the first thing I smelled was urine. I was constantly washing the rugs over and over until they were being to lose their fibers and fall apart.

Re-training a sick 18 year old cat is not practical so I had to come up with a quick solution. I purchased a pack of puppy wee wee pads and placed them next to her litter box. She began urinating on the pads so I just throw the soiled pad away ad replace it with a new one. I do this about three times per day. The pads absorb the odor, so there is no longer an odor in the bathroom and  since the pad are thrown away this eliminates an unsanitary situation. As they say “whatever works.”

I’m sure that there are other solutions but this one was quick, clean and not disruptive to Molly.

Remember, your pets count!

If you love music, especially oldies, Edgewater Gold Radio is your oldies and standards variety station! We play a large mix of oldies from the 50s through the 80’s plus timeless pop standards and lots of holiday music! Download the free Edgewater Gold Radio app today and listen on our website: The Edgewater Internet Radio Network!

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There are several answers to this question. In my opinion, if the person knows that are getting a puppy and are prepared for it, then it would be fine. If it’s going to be a surprise, then in my opinion, it is simply not a good idea.  Many times, the recipient is not prepared for the responsibility of house training and caring for a puppy. Another reason is that the person may not be able to handle the financial obligations of dog ownership.

The breed of dog that a person wishes to own is more of a personal preference. Certain breeds are better suited for certain people. Some dogs are good with children and some are not. You can’t simply go out and get a puppy for a person as a surprise and expect them to be able to love and care of it properly without even knowing anything about the dog.

Christmas puppies are chosen hastily and given quickly. The person getting the dog will not even have any of the equipment necessary to handle a new dog. Things like a dog crate , leash, food etc are very important. Most of the time the puppy will end up back at the shelter or the store where they were purchased from. This is not at all fair to the animal. My advice, don’t do it!

Remember, your pets count!

Oldies, standards and lots of holiday music is playing right now on Edgewater Gold Radio! Listen all day at work. Download the free Edgewater Gold Radio app and listen from our website: The Edgewater Internet Radio Network!

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When Your Cat Won’t Eat

Saturday, December 9, 2017
posted by Jim Murphy

Sometimes getting my cat Molly to eat can be a challenge. Some of her medication is mixed with her food so she needs to eat. Her age coupled with advanced kidney disease can decrease her appetite. The key for older cats with kidney disease is keeping them hydrated and keeping them eating.

In order to keep your cat eating, you must become very proactive. You cannot fill her bowl, leave it on the floor and assume that she’ll eat. The first thing you need to do is find out what kinds of foods entice your cat. With Molly, it’s cheese and tuna fish. This morning, I mixed the medicine with a small amount of food and at first she turned her nose and refused to eat. I sprinkled a little parmesan cheese on it and “voila” she began to eat.  I will sometimes offer a little tuna mixed in and she usually begins eating.

When mixing medication in with food, only give a very small portion at first. You must make sure that your cat is getting the full dosage of the medication so she needs to eat all of the food. After the initial feeding, I continue to give her small portions throughout the day. Moist food tends to dry out fast and cats prefer the food when it’s moist. You can add some chicken or beef broth to her food to keep it moist.

I realize that this can be a lot of work and I don’t mind. I am very glad that I am available to make sure that Molly is eating and drinking. Another very important aspect of taking care of an elderly cat is that you really need to develop a deep bond. Your cat has to trust you. You need to know her as well as she knows you.

I believe that all of these additional steps and the constant attention that I provide to Molly is keeping her alive and sustaining a pretty good quality of life at this point.

Remember, your pets count!

A snowy day on Delmarva so keep the oldies, standards and holiday music playing all day and enjoy a nice cup of hot chocolate! EDGEWATER GOLD RADIO plays em all! Download the free Edgewater Gold Radio app and listen on our website, The Edgewater Internet Radio Network!

 

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Giving Your Cat Liquid Medication

Friday, December 8, 2017
posted by Jim Murphy

Giving medication to a cat is never easy. I usually put Molly’s pill in a pill pocket. Lately sometimes she eats the pill pocket and sometimes she flatly refuses. I also have her medication available in liquid form. When she refuses to take her pill, I will administer the liquid medication. Sometimes this could be a bit difficult. VCA Animal hospital has put together detailed instructions on how to safely administer liquid medication to your cat. Thanks to VCA Animal hospital for providing this valuable information.

Prepare an area where you can safely handle your cat. Have the medication ready and in a place where it will be easily accessible. If you are administering the medication by yourself, you may find it easiest to place your cat in your lap. It may be advisable to restrain the cat by wrapping it in a blanket or towel with only its head exposed. The first few times, it may also be helpful to have someone else hold the wrapped cat while you administer the medication.
administering_liquid_medication_to_your_cat
Hold the syringe or dropper containing the medication with your dominant hand. First, allow the cat to lick the medication from the tip of the syringe as you slowly depress the plunger (many cats accept medication more readily if it is warmed to room temperature).

If your cat is not interested in licking the liquid, gently take the cat by the scruff of the neck and pull the head back, as shown in the illustration).  The mouth will then open slightly.

Place the tip of the syringe in the mouth, just behind one of the canine teeth (“fangs”), and advance the tip so that it is between the teeth. Be sure to angle the syringe slightly to the side. You do not want to forcefully inject the liquid straight into the back of the throat. This can increase the risk of the cat inhaling or aspirating the liquid.

“Make sure you do this slowly so the cat has time to swallow the liquid and breathe.”

Slowly squeeze the syringe to dispense the liquid medication. Make sure you do this slowly so the cat has time to swallow the liquid and breathe.

Most cats will spit out some of the medication. DO NOT re-medicate unless you are certain that NONE of the medication was swallowed. Your veterinarian will have accounted for a small amount of loss when calculating the required dose of medication for your cat.

Make sure you give your cat plenty of praise throughout the procedure and offer a special treat after giving the medication. This will make the experience more positive and may make it easier to give the medication the next time.

 After each use, rinse the dropper or syringe thoroughly with water and refrigerate the remaining medication if necessar

 Remember, your pets count!
Keep the greatest music playing all day at work! Edgewater Gold Radio plays a large variety of oldies from the 50s 60s 70s 80s plus great pop standards and holiday favorites. Download the free Edgewater Gold Radio app today and listen from our website: The Edgewater Internet Radio Network!

 

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The Danger of Hypothermia in Dogs

Thursday, December 7, 2017
posted by Jim Murphy

We’ve spoken about how heat affects your dog. Today, we’re gonna talk about how the cold affects your dog.  A dog with hypothermia is a very cold animal who’s losing body heat faster than he could generate more. He’ll start to shiver to warm up and every hair will stand on end to trap heat.  If his body heat falls below 100.5 Fahrenheit, hypothermia can set it.  In mild cases, your dog will seem sluggish and slow.  Get him indoors and into a nice warm room and cozy dog bed and wrap him in a warm blanket. Let him warm up slowly. If he seems so sluggish that he is near collapse, rush him to the nearest clinic for treatment.  Even if your dog gets better, have him checked by your veterinarian. Hypothermia can cause permanent damage.

Remember, your pets count!

Holiday music along with great oldies and standards are playing on Edgewater Gold Radio! Listen all day at work! Download the free Edgewater Gold Radio app today and listen on our website: The Edgewater Internet Radio Network!

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Cats are climbers by nature.  So the first time a new kitten sees the beautifully decorated Christmas tree, they have one thing on their minds. To climb it as fast as possible. This can cause a disaster! There is something you can do to keep kitty away for your beautiful tree.

Did you know that cats hate the smell of orange? They have a major aversion to the scent of the oil. So if you don’t mind a little organic clutter under the tree, spread orange peels under the base of the tree. This will work if kitty climbs up the base of the tree. If your kitty prefers to jump right onto the branches, you can make orange and clove ornaments and hang them on the tree. Stick whole cloves into oranges or tangerines and hang a few them on the lower branches of the tree. It’s one of the quickest and easiest things to do but unfortunately, it may not always work. It is worth a try before trying anything more complicated.

Good luck!

Remember, your pets count!

Coworkers working while listening to Edgewater Gold Radio!

Oldies, standards and holiday music is playing now on Edgewater Gold Radio! Download the free Edgewater Gold Radio App and listen from our website: The Edgewater Internet Radio Network!

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Kitty’s First Meal

Monday, December 4, 2017
posted by Jim Murphy

Young  kittens nurse from their mother from six to eight weeks but three weeks is a good time to get them started on solid food. Don’t worry, they have plenty of appetite for both kinds of food. That’s because young kittens need one and a half as much protein and three times as many calories per pound of body weight as an adult cat. This is easy to provide if you choose a commercially prepared kitten food, a so called “growth diet.” Make sure that you follow label instructions on how much to feed and how often. Feed a high quality food for kittens. The time will come when growth formula is too rich for your adult cat so consult with your veterinarian about the right time to switch your cats diet.  Now that you kitten is eating solid foods, soon it will be time to train him to use a litter box.  You could use a self cleaning litter box but if you’re like me, you may be better off with a simple old fashioned one.

Remember, your pets count!

When you get to work today, turn on your favorite oldies and pop standards plus holiday favorites. Your work day will fly by! Edgewater Gold Radio is the place for oldies variety. Download the free Edgewater Gold Radio app and listen from our website. The Edgewater Internet Radio Network!

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PETA is a horrible animal shelter that kills over 80% of it’s animals. Some are killed within 24 hours! Shocking?? Yes. They need to be prosecuted and shut down! It’s very disturbing to think that this kind of animal cruelty is occurring right under our noses! PETA can be classified as a euthanasia clinic! Here’s a disturbing report from the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services: This is the actual acticle.

Proof PETA kills

peta_inspectionThe Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS) requires all animal shelters to report the number of cats and dogs they take in each year. The records indicate how many cats and dogs were reclaimed by their owners, adopted out, transferred to other Virginia releasing agencies (i.e. animal shelters and animal control), transferred to out-of-state releasing agencies, died of natural causes, euthanized (killed), and how many the shelter held alive at the end of the calendar year. We added the dogs and cats euthanized and divided by the total number of dogs and cats taken in excluding those held only for sterilization surgery to determine the percentage of dogs and cats PETA killed in a given year. In 2009, Virginia modified its policy and eliminated animals held for sterilization from the records.

We obtained the reports by filing public records requests under Virginia’s sunshine laws with the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. The information for years 2004-2010 is also available on the VDACS website for public inspection (animals classified as “other” from 2004-2009 include those reported by PETA as held for sterilization).

Dogs and Cats killed by PETA

Year Received Transferred Adopted Killed
2016 1,963 478 57 2.9% 1,411 71.9%
2015 1,974 446 60 3.04% 1,456 73.76%
2014 2,631 252 39 1.48% 2,324 88.3%
2013 2,175 311 46 2.1% 1,792 82.4%
2012 1,843 130 19 1.03% 1,647 89.4%
2011 1,992 34 24 1.21% 1,911 95.9%
2010 2,345 63 44 1.86% 2,200 93.8%
2009 2,366 31 8 0.34% 2,301 97.3%
2008 2,216 34 7 0.32% 2,124 95.8%
2007 1,997 35 17 0.85% 1,815 90.9%
2006 3,061 46 12 0.39% 2,981 97.4%
2005 2,165 69 146 6.74% 1,946 89.9%
2004 2,655 1 361 13.6% 2,278 85.8%
2003 2,224 1 312 14.03% 1,911 85.9%
2002 2,680 2 382 14.25% 2,298 85.7%
2001 2,685 14 703 26.18% 1,944 72.4%
2000 2,681 28 624 23.27% 2,029 75.7%
1999 1,805 91 386 21.39% 1,328 73.6%
1998* 943 125 133 14.10% 685 72.6%
Total 42,401 2,191 3,380 8.21% 36,381 85.8%

In 2014, PETA was contracted to help remove stray dogs in Eastern Virginia. But local resident Wilber Zarate alleges in a $9.7 million lawsuit filed in Norfolk that PETA officials paid children to lure his family dog off of his porch. When the kids failed to entice Maya, a Chihuahua, PETA officials trespassed onto Mr. Zarate’s porch and nabbed the pooch.

When Mr. Zarate’s niece contacted PETA about Maya’s disappearance the next day, PETA denied even being in the area that day. When she told the representative at PETA that she had security footage of the dog napping the representative abruptly hung up. Two days later, the PETA employees who had abducted Maya returned with a fruit basket and the news that Maya was dead.

Further violating the law, PETA euthanized Maya within hours of abduction instead of waiting the legally required five days. The Commonwealth of Virginia fined PETA for this infraction.

Mr. Zarate’s daughter, who he bought Maya for as a Christmas present years before, began mourning immediately. “[Cynthia] cried for weeks, became lethargic, lost sleep, refrained from eating and lost weight,” according to the lawsuit.

Thanks to PETAkillsanimals.com for providing this valuable information.

You can sign up to join the fight against this horrendous, cruel organization right here scroll down to the bottom:   CLICK AND SIGN UP

Now some good news — There’s great oldies, standards and holiday music playing right now on Edgewater Gold Radio! Enjoy the variety. Download the free Edgewater Gold Radio app today and listen from our website, The Edgewater Internet Radio Network!

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