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Archive for April 3rd, 2012

Two cats, one household

Tuesday, April 3, 2012
posted by Jim Murphy

Mollie the dominant one

Two cats cuddling together always looks so cute and cat owners always hope for this scenario when introducing another cat. I thought that this would be the case when I introduced my younger cat Millie to my older cat Mollie about seven years ago. To my surprise, pure mayhem broke loose! Mollie hated Millie. Let the territorial control begin! Swatting, hiding hissing followed by cries for help from my poor little Millie. To this day, Mollie does not like Millie. She will stand guard at doorways so Millie can’t get through. The latest battle is the fight for the running water in the shower. They both love to drink the water when I turn it on for them mornings before I take a shower, but now they know my game. They know the time I’m going to turn it on and race to be first. Yesterday we almost had a cat fight at the shower. Millie raced to be the first in line to get a taste of that cool, running water but Mollie dashed after her, hissed, swatted and chased Millie out of the bathroom. Guess who got at the water first? It’s too late for Mollie and Millie to be friends but not too late if you’re thinking of integrating another cat into your household.

Here are some combinations that may have better results that I had.

Try not to introduce a new female to another female, from experience, “the girls” love to fight.

Males introduced to females tend to get along better. The transition will be much smoother if both cats are about the same age. The younger, the better.

1.Isolate the two at first.

2 Get them familiarized with scents, such as towels, rubbed on each cat, then left in the area of the other cat, while the cats are being kept separately.

3.Let them see each other with no physical contact.

4.Swap places . Put the older cat where the newer cat was and then do the reverse.

5.Start with short, supervised visits then gradually increase the visiting time.

6.Supervise them closely for awhile after they’re together.

7. GOOD LUCK!

Millie grabbing a drink for she's attacked!